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New winds are blowing in Galería de la Recoleta, the round buìlding just in front of the National Library (Agüero 2502). Art critic Fermín Févre has been appointed curator and, to begin the season, he has invited Liliana Golubinsky to exhibit her output. What strikes the viewer first is the power of her creations, which she achieves with an inextricable combination of colour, line and, ultimately, scale. The large format helps, of course, it makes the works look impressive, but the smaller ones are equally noteworthy. The pictures have a Renaissance-like turmoil of colour and light, which is accentuated by the artist's deliberate references to history using fragments of oil paintings of heroic equestrian figures, armies, navies, portraits of Virgin Mary, which she pastes or recreates in a wild naif style under waves of vigorously applied hues. The mixtures of techniques also provide a striking visual effect. These are enhanced by Golubinsky's very original use of graphisms that look like writing (often in a specular method like that of Da Vinci's) as well as the inclusion of maps. All this may sound chaotic, but the artist is firmly in charge and, for all the barrage of stimuli provided by the myriad of differing elements, there is an underlying sense of order, which makes this show doubly exciting. Not unlike a roller coaster, for you to arrive safely in the end.